The Thinning Of The Antarctic Ice Shelf May Be About To Collapse

The ice shelf in the eastern Antarctic peninsula has been thinning for hundreds of years, which could lead to the collapse of the ice shelf, according to a climatological study published Tuesday by nature research.

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Ice shelves on earth have been shrinking in size, melting, breaking apart or even disappearing altogether. In 2017, the collapse of the epic ice shelf, larsen C, set the world on fire, and the larsen C event is considered “a tipping point in global climate change.”

To investigate the factors that have driven the mass loss of ice shelves in the past and their impact on the present, William dickens, a scientist at the British Antarctic survey, and his colleagues constructed a record of melt-water release across 6,250 years by analyzing oxygen isotopes in a single-celled algae. The algae were preserved in a core of Marine sediments in the northeast corner of the Antarctic peninsula. A lower isotope value corresponds to a higher release of fresh water from the glacier.

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The team found that meltwater release from glaciers increased after 1400 and reached an unprecedented level after 1706, with a significant acceleration observed after 1912. The findings suggest that ice shelves in the region have been thinning at an accelerating rate for about 300 years. This could lead to the collapse of the Antarctic ice shelf as man-made warming intensifies.

The researchers believe that the accelerated thinning of the ice shelf is partly due to changes in the southern hemisphere’s annular model (SAM), which drives stronger westerlies to the east of the Antarctic peninsula, warming the atmosphere and melting the ice shelf, as well as bringing warm ocean water into the weidel circulation, which may exacerbate the melting of the bottom of the ice shelf. Similarly, the increasing frequency of SAM changes in recent years may reflect the dominant influence of greenhouse gas levels and ozone depletion, and may lead to accelerated mass loss of future glaciers.

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celeration observed after 1912. The findings suggest that ice shelves in the region have been thinning at an accelerating rate for about 300 years. This could lead to the collapse of the Antarctic ice shelf as man-made warming intensifies.

The researchers believe that the accelerated thinning of the ice shelf is partly due to changes in the southern hemisphere’s annular model (SAM), which drives stronger westerlies to the east of the Antarctic peninsula, warming the atmosphere and melting the ice shelf, as well as bringing warm ocean water into the weidel circulation, which may exacerbate the melting of the bottom of the ice shelf. Similarly, the increasing frequency of SAM changes in recent years may reflect the dominant influence of greenhouse gas levels and ozone depletion, and may lead to accelerated mass loss of future glaciers.