India’s “Bus Toilet” Wants To Let Women Go To The Toilet Cleanly And Safely

After Indian President Modi took office in May 2014, he launched a “Swaph Bharat Abhiyan” campaign to improve public health in India with the goal of building 1.11 million toilets in five years.According to the Iindia Times, Modi said in September 2018 that the Indian government has built 83 million toilets since 2014. “Today, 90% of Indians have toilets, compared with 40% before 2014.

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Under the Indian government’s strong construction of toilets, Ulka Sadalkar and Rajeev Kher opened a company providing mobile toilet services in Pune, a city of 4 million in western India. In 2016, they converted an old municipal bus into a female mobile public toilet.

Under the Indian government’s strong construction of toilets, Ulka Sadalkar and Rajeev Kher opened a company providing mobile toilet services in Pune, a city of 4 million in western India. In 2016, they converted an old municipal bus into a female mobile public toilet.

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The idea came from a meeting with the Pune Municipal Company a few years ago, where it discussed “how to provide more toilets for women in the city.” At that time, two entrepreneurs had provided mobile toilets for construction sites and event planning companies. Sadalkar recalls: “Cityman Kumar suggested that we draw inspiration from a similar model in San Francisco. The San Francisco project is to transform the old bus into a bathroom for the homeless.”

Most bus toilets are powered by solar energy and provide wifi. Users only need to pay 5 rupees (about 0.5 yuan) to use the shower, changing diaper station, sanitary napkins, drinking water and breastfeeding space. The television on the bus broadcasts information videos about menstrual problems, treatment of urinary tract infections and self-examination of breast cancer. The rear part of each bus is designed as a mini-café with a full-time waiter and an emergency button that can be linked to an external alarm to prevent passengers from feeling unsafe. The bus can be connected to the sewer, and the bus also has a container space for storing dirt before it is sent to the sewage treatment facility.

The purpose of this is to give women the security and dignity they should have.Currently, the project is supported by local governments and corporate social responsibility funds.The average daily traffic of bus toilets is between 100 and 150 people, with 300 women on peak days.

Sadalkar said: “Our long-term goal is to make the modified bus a health information center through which information about epidemiological warnings (such as malaria and dengue) can be delivered to people without difficulty, so that the message is quickly passed to people.”